Archive 2018

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Healthcare Simulation: Innovators Wanted

Modelling and Simulation are concerned with exactly that: replicating the model and simulating the conditions as close as possible to the current standard. In some cases, creating that perfect simulated experience takes a lot of innovation and creativity. I applaud and respect the many simulationists that work behind the scenes in modelling to increase the realism of training experiences.
With many healthcare simulation centres that are underfunded and understaffed, it takes innovation and creativity to make things happen. It takes a keen eye to redistribute resources as needed. From experience as a former centre administrator, I noticed that we were going through an insane amount of oxygen in our labs that carried significant cost. What could be done to optimize resources? Several things:
First, we needed to understand how much oxygen was costing us to provide a picture of the financial importance. Next, we needed to collect information from instructors, staff and ask vital questions regarding learner safety such as “do we actually place oxygen on a live person in a simulated experience?”, “does the simulator only receive oxygen?”, “does real oxygen actually change the simulator’s vital signs?”, “what safety labelling do we need to place on a nursing headwall?” and so on. I would also recommend performing a risk assessment with key external stakeholders including occupational health and safety departments. When you have collected the information and identified risks, you can make an evidence-based decision with your team.
In my situation, we made the switch to compressed air. The cost to create a compressed air delivery system was minimal compared to cost savings of traditional oxygen. The decision to switch had additional benefits that included the injection of tens of thousands of budget dollars could be reallocated into program support per year. Yes, per year! It also decreased operational demand as we did not need to have staff call suppliers, request refills, set aside delivery time, pay for cylinder maintenance, etc.
Many healthcare simulation centres are not fully supported and rely on the innovation of team members to maximize operations. Take a look around your department, what do you see that could be optimized? Send me an email, I’d love to hear about it.
Matthew
About the Author: Matthew Jubelius is a subject matter expert in healthcare simulation. He is a consultant, educator and wants to change the future of people development, education, and training. He has championed the design, implementation, and evaluation of simulation-based education and training programs, including quality improvement measures for post-secondary institutions, private industry, and the federal government.
Matthew can be reached through www.amoveotraining.com for simulation consulting, program development, employee training and speaking engagements.
#simulation #safety #education #qualityimprovement

Simulation: Using Quality Improvement to Increase Patient Safety

Simulation: Using Quality Improvement to Increase Patient Safety

Simulation-based Education (SBE) is a wonderful teaching and learning application to increase patient safety, but did you know that it can also be used for quality improvement activities as well?
So, what’s the big deal with quality improvement and why does it matter? Quality improvement (QI) is used in many industries to decrease variation and there is a huge focus on standardization. This includes documentation and educational sessions to ensure that everyone is following the same process and approaching situations in the same manner. In previous posts, we mentioned the importance of having certain elements when designing an immersive scenario (feel free to take a look at the post What’s the Plan: The Importance of Design). This is a standardized approach that allows the instructor to design a plan that is consistent.
Being consistent is a key feature in quality improvement activities. If there are several different approaches being used, there is a potential not only for error, but also contributes to waste such as materials, time, etc. Demonstrating a consistent approach to designing a SBE activity helps ensure that clear learning objectives are being met, which helps the learner demonstrate competency and safe patient care. For example, when learning about how to obtain a blood pressure or auscultate heart and lung sounds, there is a clear and distinct order in how to perform the assessments. If healthcare professional #1 decides to talk while listening to heart and lung sounds, it may take longer to obtain clinical findings and they may be inaccurate. If healthcare professional #2 decides to obtain clinical information without the proper equipment, there will be challenges in understanding the competency of professional #2. Of course, these are hypothetical examples of variance to approaching patient care.
So, how do we decrease variance and improve quality improvement? Try using a checklist with your individual and team care. What’s working and what is the team great at? Are there some items that you would like to see improvement on? What are they and how will you measure success?
There are many opportunities to use QI activities to improve patient safety. Whether through implementing them in a SBE experience or in real-time, the benefits to the patient are positive. And, that’s who this is for.
Have an outstanding week,
Matthew
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About the Author: Matthew Jubelius wants to change the future of people development, education, and training. He has championed the design, implementation, and evaluation of simulation-based education and training programs, including quality improvement measures for post-secondary institutions, private industry, and the federal government. Matthew can be reached through www.amoveotraining.ca

Fidelity, and an Important Announcement

Fidelity, and an Important Announcement

The truth. Reality. Realism. Simulationists, educators and scientists are constantly looking to model products to reflect realistic environments and systems. There are no shortage of options on the market and depending on what the focus is the competition increases.

From DIY spreadsheet EMRs, patient simulators to augmented reality, everyone is looking the next level of realism in training. This is actually a good thing though because the entire premise of simulation is to accurately model reality. In previous posts, we have talked about why realism matters and how technology changes, which brings the medical and healthcare simulation education and training communities to that next level.

With the increasing need to increase the level of realism, I’m excited to announce the release of our ultra-realistic task trainers. The most noticeable features are the feel, textured skin, subcutaneous fat layer and did I mention that the trainers are custom-made according to your organization’s needs? If you need a product that has 4-inch deep wounds and 5 inches long, we can build it. If you need a task trainer for wound packing and need it to respond to treatment therapies, we can help. Each model is robust, durable, made with medical grade products and is skin-safe. Here’s what hospital-based wound care committees are saying after using our products:
Looking for products that take your education and training to the next level? That’s what Amoveo Training Inc. does every day. If your organization is looking for customizable task trainers that models and responds like human tissue, learn more through www.amoveotraining.com

Cheers,

Matthew

About the Author: Matthew Jubelius is a subject matter expert in healthcare simulation. He is a consultant, educator and wants to change the future of people development, education, and training. He has championed the design, implementation, and evaluation of simulation-based education and training programs, including quality improvement measures for post-secondary institutions, private industry, and the federal government.

 

Matthew can be reached through www.amoveotraining.com for simulation consulting, program development, employee training and speaking engagements.

 

#healthcare #safety #simulation #education

How Simulation Builds Organizational Culture

How Simulation Builds Organizational Culture

Let’s face it, simulation is a very powerful tool for learning. With foundations in aviation and military applications, more evidence is growing in its many medical benefits. Healthcare educators plan for the development and integration into curriculum and simulation-based education is picking up momentum. While many instructors are comfortable being behind the scenes and observing student performance when was the last time an instructor took part in a simulation experience as a learner? This key question can advance your SIM program by leaps and bounds, or delay it. Why? Organizational culture.

Workplace culture affects us all. It shows us what behaviours are generally accepted and culture reflects where we work. For example, in some academic settings, people stick to their own groups and we refer to this as being in a silo. Doctors train with doctors, nurses with nurses, paramedics with paramedics and so on. For some organizations, this is the norm. It’s a very old school way of learning, but it’s true. It exists.

Let’s introduce simulation-based education into the picture. The silo-based organizational culture shouts from the rooftops “Simulation is the best!”, “We need to train more [insert whichever healthcare profession you like] with the simulators” and other evangelical statements. Depending on how entrenched the organizational culture is, watch what happens when another faculty wants to take part in simulation. All of a sudden, statements like “this is OURS”, “We get priority over faculty XYZ” and all sorts of unproductive comments come out. Suddenly, it becomes impossible to collaborate due to budget restrictions, faculty release time and other administrative excuses. These are red flags about organizational culture.

Wait a second? Isn’t this whole education thing about helping learners? It sure is. If you want to advance your program, it starts with the instructor champions. Want to incorporate interdisciplinary simulations in your organization? Involve your champions. Lead by example and have students watch the instructors is a simulation experience. I bet that you will have a ton of people who see the value of breaking down those educational silos.

Want to develop organizational culture through simulation? Let’s connect through www.amoveotraining.com

Cheers,

Matthew

About the Author: Matthew Jubelius is a subject matter expert in healthcare simulation. He is a consultant, educator and wants to change the future of people development, education, and training. He has championed the design, implementation, and evaluation of simulation-based education and training programs, including quality improvement measures for post-secondary institutions, private industry, and the federal government.

Matthew can be reached through www.amoveotraining.com for simulation consulting, program development, employee training and speaking engagements.

#simulation #safety #education #qualityimprovement

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