How Simulation Builds Organizational Culture

How Simulation Builds Organizational Culture

Let’s face it, simulation is a very powerful tool for learning. With foundations in aviation and military applications, more evidence is growing in its many medical benefits. Healthcare educators plan for the development and integration into curriculum and simulation-based education is picking up momentum. While many instructors are comfortable being behind the scenes and observing student performance when was the last time an instructor took part in a simulation experience as a learner? This key question can advance your SIM program by leaps and bounds, or delay it. Why? Organizational culture.

Workplace culture affects us all. It shows us what behaviours are generally accepted and culture reflects where we work. For example, in some academic settings, people stick to their own groups and we refer to this as being in a silo. Doctors train with doctors, nurses with nurses, paramedics with paramedics and so on. For some organizations, this is the norm. It’s a very old school way of learning, but it’s true. It exists.

Let’s introduce simulation-based education into the picture. The silo-based organizational culture shouts from the rooftops “Simulation is the best!”, “We need to train more [insert whichever healthcare profession you like] with the simulators” and other evangelical statements. Depending on how entrenched the organizational culture is, watch what happens when another faculty wants to take part in simulation. All of a sudden, statements like “this is OURS”, “We get priority over faculty XYZ” and all sorts of unproductive comments come out. Suddenly, it becomes impossible to collaborate due to budget restrictions, faculty release time and other administrative excuses. These are red flags about organizational culture.

Wait a second? Isn’t this whole education thing about helping learners? It sure is. If you want to advance your program, it starts with the instructor champions. Want to incorporate interdisciplinary simulations in your organization? Involve your champions. Lead by example and have students watch the instructors is a simulation experience. I bet that you will have a ton of people who see the value of breaking down those educational silos.

Want to develop organizational culture through simulation? Let’s connect through www.amoveotraining.com

Cheers,

Matthew

About the Author: Matthew Jubelius is a subject matter expert in healthcare simulation. He is a consultant, educator and wants to change the future of people development, education, and training. He has championed the design, implementation, and evaluation of simulation-based education and training programs, including quality improvement measures for post-secondary institutions, private industry, and the federal government.

Matthew can be reached through www.amoveotraining.com for simulation consulting, program development, employee training and speaking engagements.

#simulation #safety #education #qualityimprovement

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Congratulations! You Have Robots, Now What?

Congratulations! You Have Robots, Now What?

You’ve made the business case for purchasing (including the extended maintenance agreement), celebrated the approval from your supervisor and have been waiting patiently for your new simulator to show up. And then, it finally happened.

You unbox the high fidelity patient simulator and laptop(s), assemble the fluid ports, cables, cords and so on.  You stand back and admire the pristine look of the simulator and perhaps dream of how you’ll impact the world of teaching and learning. Someone calls you and says “let’s do a simulation this afternoon”. Excitedly, you say “YES!”…but here’s why you should say “I love your enthusiasm, but let’s reschedule for a later date.”

New technology is pretty appealing, but without understanding how your simulator functions on-site could mean some unnecessary technological and professional relationship hiccups.

If you’re running a wireless connection, how does it perform? What’s the actual distance that your connection can really perform at? Is the software lagging? What about wireless interference? Do cell phones cause connection issues? If you’re using wireless cameras for recording and debriefing, do they cause any issues? I encourage you to be very curious at this stage and test, test, TEST your simulator and environment before running scenarios!

You’ve read the instructions, filled the fluid ports and feel like you are ready to start running scenarios. Have you considered failure and contingency planning? Discussing this with your teams will definitely help you and your program. Dealing with a massive technological failure mid-scenario can be embarrassing and frustrating to you, learners and instructors. Not knowing how to deal with failures can add even more stress to the situation. Do some risk analysis and draft up a plan of “if XYZ happens, the next steps are…”

It’s always exciting to receive new technology, however, there’s a lot of planning that should be considered from the time that the simulator arrives and when actual simulations are being performed. By planning, testing and refining actual performance and processes, your simulation teams can alleviate many potential headaches.

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Have an awesome week,

Matthew

About the Author: Matthew Jubelius is a subject matter expert in healthcare simulation. He is a consultant, educator and wants to change the future of people development, education, and training. He has championed the design, implementation, and evaluation of simulation-based education and training programs, including quality improvement measures for post-secondary institutions, private industry, and the federal government.

Matthew can be reached through www.amoveotraining.com for simulation consulting, program development, employee training and speaking engagements.

#safety #simulation #education

Experience: The greatest teacher.

Experience: The greatest teacher.

Our experiences shape us into who we are…for the most part. We grow up, the family we were born and those relationships shape some of our early understanding of relationships, values and so on. We learn how we are treated and how we like to be treated.

We go to school, become educated, make friends and our experiences generally shape us into future practitioners. We encounter really amazing teachers and instructors… and also some not-so-great ones.

What did these experiences do for our personal and professional development? Did we experience and accept behaviours such as “it’s okay to yell at another medical staff member in front of others” or “nurses eat their young”? Did we help colleagues that we’re struggling? Did we lose our empathy in order to “toughen up”? Are we too tired to care? Or, did we stand up? Did we say something?  Whatever our experiences are, we have the ability to choose who we want to be as healthcare practitioners and as human beings.

How does this relate to simulation-based education and training? You can model each one of the experiences as listed above in order to educate future practitioners that horizontal violence is wrong, that everyone needs help sometimes, that empathy should be a valued skill in caring for others. Much of the education that we deliver is procedure-based and delivering safe care, but there’s an opportunity to integrate behaviour-based safety as well. Developing simulations that address critical workplace issues can be extremely valuable for ourselves, learners and the future of our respected professions.

The truth is that some people have been shaped by kindness and have never experienced real hardship, while others have been affected by tragedy and personal battles. Regardless of one’s circumstances, we can agree that experience is the greatest teacher. It shapes us into who we are.

This week, I challenge you to teach someone on a topic that you feel is very important. I’d love to hear about what you did and what the impact was.

Be the Change.

Matthew
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About the Author: Matthew Jubelius is a subject matter expert in healthcare simulation. He is a consultant, educator and wants to change the future of people development, education, and training. Matthew has championed the design, implementation, and evaluation of simulation-based education and training programs, including quality improvement measures for post-secondary institutions, private industry, and the federal government.

Matthew can be reached through www.amoveotraining.com for simulation consulting, program development, employee training and speaking engagements.

#simulation #education #healthcare #qualityimprovement

Developing People

Developing People

Have you ever started a new job? Of course! We all have. Depending on your surroundings, it can be pretty intimidating. While learning your new role in addition to (but not limited to) break schedules, Human Resources info, Occupational Health and Safety policies, organizational processes, getting to know your supervisor, names of the administrative staff, colleagues and so on… how do you develop in the role?
There are many approaches to people development and perhaps the one that we are most familiar with is the “sink or swim” mentality. Personally, I believe that this approach is antiquated and does not set people up for success. Work cultures are changing and we can take an approach from simulation training and apply it to employee development.
Simulation can be defined as the replication of a system. An immersive scenario or event is designed and modeled according to objectives and expectations and an accurate simulation reflects the fidelity or reality of the system. With this in mind, how do we use simulation to develop new hires? Modeling. No, not the runway and catwalk in New York or Milan type; model the behaviors and reality of the job. Here’s why modeling is important – it sets the nature or tone of the working relationship and the first 90 days are critical to employee development.
The most important development tool during the modeling phase is the mentor, buddy, senior staff or whatever the common term is in your workplace. This mentor should be someone who is great at their job and who demonstrates or models the key characteristics that you want to see in the new employee. Consider the example of someone who is happy at work, who lends a helping hand to colleagues and does a good job. Alternatively, think about the mentor who was “told” that they are mentoring a new staff member 15 minutes before a shift begins. There can be two very different experiences and outcomes for the new employee and mentor. Either way, the result reflects the working culture and expectations of the new hire.
Bringing new employees on board can be an exhilarating experience and is a critical piece in employee development. The use of modeling key behaviors and expectations through mentors that we see in a simulation can help alleviate stress for new employees, help build positive relationships, impact work culture and most importantly, set the person up for success.
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Create an outstanding week,
Matthew
About the Author: Matthew Jubelius is a subject matter expert in healthcare simulation. He is a consultant, educator and wants to change the future of people development, education, and training. He has championed the design, implementation, and evaluation of simulation-based education and training programs, including quality improvement measures for post-secondary institutions, private industry, and the federal government. Matthew can be reached through www.amoveotraining.ca for simulation consulting, program and people development opportunities.

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