Simulation: Using Quality Improvement to Increase Patient Safety

Simulation: Using Quality Improvement to Increase Patient Safety

Simulation-based Education (SBE) is a wonderful teaching and learning application to increase patient safety, but did you know that it can also be used for quality improvement activities as well?
So, what’s the big deal with quality improvement and why does it matter? Quality improvement (QI) is used in many industries to decrease variation and there is a huge focus on standardization. This includes documentation and educational sessions to ensure that everyone is following the same process and approaching situations in the same manner. In previous posts, we mentioned the importance of having certain elements when designing an immersive scenario (feel free to take a look at the post What’s the Plan: The Importance of Design). This is a standardized approach that allows the instructor to design a plan that is consistent.
Being consistent is a key feature in quality improvement activities. If there are several different approaches being used, there is a potential not only for error, but also contributes to waste such as materials, time, etc. Demonstrating a consistent approach to designing a SBE activity helps ensure that clear learning objectives are being met, which helps the learner demonstrate competency and safe patient care. For example, when learning about how to obtain a blood pressure or auscultate heart and lung sounds, there is a clear and distinct order in how to perform the assessments. If healthcare professional #1 decides to talk while listening to heart and lung sounds, it may take longer to obtain clinical findings and they may be inaccurate. If healthcare professional #2 decides to obtain clinical information without the proper equipment, there will be challenges in understanding the competency of professional #2. Of course, these are hypothetical examples of variance to approaching patient care.
So, how do we decrease variance and improve quality improvement? Try using a checklist with your individual and team care. What’s working and what is the team great at? Are there some items that you would like to see improvement on? What are they and how will you measure success?
There are many opportunities to use QI activities to improve patient safety. Whether through implementing them in a SBE experience or in real-time, the benefits to the patient are positive. And, that’s who this is for.
Have an outstanding week,
Matthew
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About the Author: Matthew Jubelius wants to change the future of people development, education, and training. He has championed the design, implementation, and evaluation of simulation-based education and training programs, including quality improvement measures for post-secondary institutions, private industry, and the federal government. Matthew can be reached through www.amoveotraining.ca

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Fidelity, and an Important Announcement

Fidelity, and an Important Announcement

The truth. Reality. Realism. Simulationists, educators and scientists are constantly looking to model products to reflect realistic environments and systems. There are no shortage of options on the market and depending on what the focus is the competition increases.

From DIY spreadsheet EMRs, patient simulators to augmented reality, everyone is looking the next level of realism in training. This is actually a good thing though because the entire premise of simulation is to accurately model reality. In previous posts, we have talked about why realism matters and how technology changes, which brings the medical and healthcare simulation education and training communities to that next level.

With the increasing need to increase the level of realism, I’m excited to announce the release of our ultra-realistic task trainers. The most noticeable features are the feel, textured skin, subcutaneous fat layer and did I mention that the trainers are custom-made according to your organization’s needs? If you need a product that has 4-inch deep wounds and 5 inches long, we can build it. If you need a task trainer for wound packing and need it to respond to treatment therapies, we can help. Each model is robust, durable, made with medical grade products and is skin-safe. Here’s what hospital-based wound care committees are saying after using our products:
Looking for products that take your education and training to the next level? That’s what Amoveo Training Inc. does every day. If your organization is looking for customizable task trainers that models and responds like human tissue, learn more through www.amoveotraining.com

Cheers,

Matthew

About the Author: Matthew Jubelius is a subject matter expert in healthcare simulation. He is a consultant, educator and wants to change the future of people development, education, and training. He has championed the design, implementation, and evaluation of simulation-based education and training programs, including quality improvement measures for post-secondary institutions, private industry, and the federal government.

 

Matthew can be reached through www.amoveotraining.com for simulation consulting, program development, employee training and speaking engagements.

 

#healthcare #safety #simulation #education

Congratulations! You Have Robots, Now What?

Congratulations! You Have Robots, Now What?

You’ve made the business case for purchasing (including the extended maintenance agreement), celebrated the approval from your supervisor and have been waiting patiently for your new simulator to show up. And then, it finally happened.

You unbox the high fidelity patient simulator and laptop(s), assemble the fluid ports, cables, cords and so on.  You stand back and admire the pristine look of the simulator and perhaps dream of how you’ll impact the world of teaching and learning. Someone calls you and says “let’s do a simulation this afternoon”. Excitedly, you say “YES!”…but here’s why you should say “I love your enthusiasm, but let’s reschedule for a later date.”

New technology is pretty appealing, but without understanding how your simulator functions on-site could mean some unnecessary technological and professional relationship hiccups.

If you’re running a wireless connection, how does it perform? What’s the actual distance that your connection can really perform at? Is the software lagging? What about wireless interference? Do cell phones cause connection issues? If you’re using wireless cameras for recording and debriefing, do they cause any issues? I encourage you to be very curious at this stage and test, test, TEST your simulator and environment before running scenarios!

You’ve read the instructions, filled the fluid ports and feel like you are ready to start running scenarios. Have you considered failure and contingency planning? Discussing this with your teams will definitely help you and your program. Dealing with a massive technological failure mid-scenario can be embarrassing and frustrating to you, learners and instructors. Not knowing how to deal with failures can add even more stress to the situation. Do some risk analysis and draft up a plan of “if XYZ happens, the next steps are…”

It’s always exciting to receive new technology, however, there’s a lot of planning that should be considered from the time that the simulator arrives and when actual simulations are being performed. By planning, testing and refining actual performance and processes, your simulation teams can alleviate many potential headaches.

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Have an awesome week,

Matthew

About the Author: Matthew Jubelius is a subject matter expert in healthcare simulation. He is a consultant, educator and wants to change the future of people development, education, and training. He has championed the design, implementation, and evaluation of simulation-based education and training programs, including quality improvement measures for post-secondary institutions, private industry, and the federal government.

Matthew can be reached through www.amoveotraining.com for simulation consulting, program development, employee training and speaking engagements.

#safety #simulation #education

Experience: The greatest teacher.

Experience: The greatest teacher.

Our experiences shape us into who we are…for the most part. We grow up, the family we were born and those relationships shape some of our early understanding of relationships, values and so on. We learn how we are treated and how we like to be treated.

We go to school, become educated, make friends and our experiences generally shape us into future practitioners. We encounter really amazing teachers and instructors… and also some not-so-great ones.

What did these experiences do for our personal and professional development? Did we experience and accept behaviours such as “it’s okay to yell at another medical staff member in front of others” or “nurses eat their young”? Did we help colleagues that we’re struggling? Did we lose our empathy in order to “toughen up”? Are we too tired to care? Or, did we stand up? Did we say something?  Whatever our experiences are, we have the ability to choose who we want to be as healthcare practitioners and as human beings.

How does this relate to simulation-based education and training? You can model each one of the experiences as listed above in order to educate future practitioners that horizontal violence is wrong, that everyone needs help sometimes, that empathy should be a valued skill in caring for others. Much of the education that we deliver is procedure-based and delivering safe care, but there’s an opportunity to integrate behaviour-based safety as well. Developing simulations that address critical workplace issues can be extremely valuable for ourselves, learners and the future of our respected professions.

The truth is that some people have been shaped by kindness and have never experienced real hardship, while others have been affected by tragedy and personal battles. Regardless of one’s circumstances, we can agree that experience is the greatest teacher. It shapes us into who we are.

This week, I challenge you to teach someone on a topic that you feel is very important. I’d love to hear about what you did and what the impact was.

Be the Change.

Matthew
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About the Author: Matthew Jubelius is a subject matter expert in healthcare simulation. He is a consultant, educator and wants to change the future of people development, education, and training. Matthew has championed the design, implementation, and evaluation of simulation-based education and training programs, including quality improvement measures for post-secondary institutions, private industry, and the federal government.

Matthew can be reached through www.amoveotraining.com for simulation consulting, program development, employee training and speaking engagements.

#simulation #education #healthcare #qualityimprovement

Sticking with the Immersive Scenario Design

Sticking with the Immersive Scenario Design

A core theme in simulation-based education and training is standardization. That is, when a scenario designed and planned, all trainee groups go through the same designed experience. Why? Consistency, fairness and a clear standard of expected competency.

If a scenario is designed with specific learning objectives, all teams must meet those objectives and participate in the debriefing process. The competency and standards are the same for everyone. If the scenario is designed according to Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) guidelines, the protocols apply to everyone, equally.

Working with thousands of simulation trainee groups, I remember a specific experience when an instructor was kind of showing off. This particular day, we had several observers in the control area. We had run through and completed a simulation experience and the scenario was announced “Complete. Proceed to the debriefing area”. The instructor turned to everyone and said “watch this” (which in my humble opinion the equivalent of “hold my beer”). The instructor crashed the simulator and the EMS trainee team looked at each other, said “seriously?” and went into another ACLS scenario that was not part of the plan. Afterwards, I asked the instructor what was with the departure of the planned design, the response was “well, anything can happen in EMS”. True, however, this presented a teachable moment with the instructor for several reasons.

I completely understand and appreciate the instructor’s viewpoint that anything can happen in EMS and we had a great professional exchange. We discussed items that might not have been considered such as the added time that the impromptu ACLS scenario added, the extra debriefing for the group and discussed what the added value was of the experience. There were other items that weren’t accounted for. The added time had delayed the operations and administration team in their workflow, other centre users that were delayed, the extra resources that were used, and that we did not have the adequate time to discuss the experience with the observers who also needed debriefing. Also, the other EMS trainee groups asked why they did not get the extra simulation experience and expressed their frustration. The group was right, they did not receive the same standard as others. The deviation of the design plan had a massive rippling effect.

Remember, simulation-based education is about standardization, consistency and sticking with the design. It’s important to be mindful that deviating from the plan can have unforeseen impacts. With clear learning objectives, trainees will shape the experience through their actions and response. It’s about the learning experience.

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Cheers,

Matthew

About the Author: Matthew Jubelius is a subject matter expert in healthcare simulation. He is a consultant, educator and wants to change the future of people development, education, and training. Matthew has championed the design, implementation, and evaluation of simulation-based education and training programs, including quality improvement measures for post-secondary institutions, private industry, and the federal government.

Matthew can be reached through www.amoveotraining.ca for simulation consulting, program development, employee training and speaking engagements.

#simulation #education #patientsafety #leadership

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